Sweden’s ATG Will No Longer Accept Foreigners’ Bets

AB Trav och Galopp (ATG), Sweden’s licensed horse racing and trotting operator, has confirmed that it will not accept customer registrations from non-nationals anymore.

ATG Will Not Accept Bets from Customers without a Swedish ID

AB Trav och Galopp (ATG) has confirmed it will no longer accept customer registrations from foreigners anymore. ATG’s venues are forced to register all players placing bets at its venues, following new rules by the Swedish gambling regulatory regime. Customers who are not in the Swedish national ID register systems will not be permitted to place bets on ATG games and tracks. ATG stated all existing terminals would be replaced with ID-required machines as part of its digital makeover project.

In a statement, ATG said that as of July 1, foreign visitors are no longer allowed to open temporary ATG accounts. They won’t be able to play in the terminal on the tracks or in the stores. Before an internal review, the ATG management has decided it would no longer accept foreign player registrations.

According to ATG, its team had to go through significant administrative tasks to register foreign customers and allocate their winnings. Only syndicated partners could accept non-national players betting on Swedish racing tracks and pools.

Customers who are not eligible to obtain an ATG account are referred to the gaming operators in their countries. Foreign visitors can play on their country’s respective gaming company while they are in Sweden. This summer, ATG said that its new V64 Xpress competition format would boost its engagement with the winter schedule of Swedish trotting fixtures.

ATG Received Several Warnings Breaching Age Requirement Rules

Recently ATG and Polar Limited, the operating company of Coolbet.com, were warned by the Swedish gambling regulator Spelinspektionen for breaching Sweden’s sports betting rules. In February, it was announced that ATG failed to comply with the legal age rules and accepted bets on a horse ridden by an underage jockey.

ATG reported the incident willingly to Sweden’s gaming regulatory watchdog, explaining all the details of the breach and promised to take the necessary measures to prevent such incidents from happening again. Since then, the operator took action to ensure that wagering on underage competitors won’t happen again.

Before that incident, Spelinspektionen noticed that ATG didn’t display age requirements on some of its ads in the way it should have. Then the operator faced a fine of $175,422 for any subsequent breach. The operator also sent marketing messages to 77 people who had registered in a self-exclusion program and was warned it would pay a fine of $337,980.